10 Types Of Wild Fruit Trees In Missouri


  1. Home
  2. /
  3. Trees
  4. /
  5. Fruit Trees
  6. /
  7. 10 Types Of Wild...

Types of wild fruit trees found in Missouri are Crabapple, Chokecherry, Serviceberry, Wild Plum, Mulberry, Pawpaw, Persimmon, Blackberry, Raspberry, and Gooseberry.

In this blog, we will explore the different types of wild fruit trees found in Missouri, their characteristics, and the best ways to harvest and use them.

From foraging for wild berries in the summer to making homemade jams and jellies from wild plums in the fall, there are many ways to enjoy the abundance of wild fruit trees in Missouri. Join us as we discover the delicious world of wild fruit trees in Missouri.

Wild Fruit Trees In Missouri

Types Of Wild Fruit Trees In Missouri

Missouri is home to many different types of wild fruit trees, each with their own unique characteristics and uses. In this section, we will take a closer look at some of the most commonly found wild fruit trees in Missouri:

Crabapple: The crabapple tree is a small, deciduous tree that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the crabapple tree is small and tart, and is often used to make jelly, preserves, and cider.

Chokecherry: The chokecherry is a small, shrubby tree that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the chokecherry is small, dark red, and quite tart. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and wine.

Serviceberry: The serviceberry is a small, deciduous tree that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the serviceberry is small, sweet, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

Wild plum: The wild plum is a small, deciduous tree that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the wild plum is small, sweet, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

Mulberry: The mulberry tree is a large, deciduous tree that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the mulberry tree is large, sweet, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

Pawpaw: The pawpaw is a large, deciduous tree that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the pawpaw is large, sweet, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

Persimmon: The persimmon tree is a large, deciduous tree that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the persimmon tree is large, sweet, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

Blackberry: The blackberry is a large, deciduous shrub that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the blackberry is large, sweet, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

Raspberry: The raspberry is a large, deciduous shrub that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the raspberry is large, sweet, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

Gooseberry: The gooseberry is a small, deciduous shrub that is commonly found in Missouri’s woodlands and along riverbanks. The fruit of the gooseberry is small, tart, and juicy. It is often used to make jelly, preserves, and pies.

All these wild fruit trees can be found throughout Missouri, they can be a great source of nutrition, and a fun way to explore the state’s natural beauty.

[Related Article: 6 Types Of Wild Fruit Trees In Oklahoma]

Characteristics Of Wild Fruit Trees In Missouri

Climate: Missouri has a diverse climate, with hot summers and cold winters. Wild fruit trees in Missouri are adapted to these conditions and can be found in a variety of regions throughout the state. Some wild fruit trees, such as the serviceberry, can be found in the northern regions of Missouri, while others, like the pawpaw, can be found in the southern regions.

Soil conditions: Wild fruit trees in Missouri can be found in a variety of soil conditions, from sandy soils to clay soils. Some wild fruit trees, such as the mulberry, can tolerate poor soil conditions, while others, like the persimmon, prefer well-drained soils. It is important to note that wild fruit trees may have different soil preferences, so it is important to research the specific tree you are interested in before planting or harvesting.

Fruit size and taste: The size and taste of wild fruit trees in Missouri can vary greatly depending on the species. For example, the fruit of a wild plum tree is small and tart, while the fruit of a pawpaw tree is large and sweet. Some wild fruit trees, such as the blackberry, have small, tart berries that can be used for jams and jellies, while others, like the gooseberry, have larger, sweeter berries that can be eaten fresh or used for baking.

Pollination: Wild fruit trees in Missouri are typically self-fertile, meaning that they do not require cross-pollination from another tree to produce fruit. However, some wild fruit trees, such as the serviceberry, do require cross-pollination from a nearby tree to produce a good crop of fruit. It is important to research the specific tree you are interested in to understand its pollination needs.

Harvesting And Using Wild Fruit

Harvesting and using wild fruit is a great way to take advantage of the abundance of these delicious and nutritious fruits that can be found in Missouri. In order to get the best quality fruit, it is important to know the best time to harvest.

The best time to harvest wild fruit trees in Missouri depends on the type of fruit. Berries such as blackberries, raspberries, and gooseberries are typically ripe in late June to early July.

Wild plums are usually ready for picking in August, while persimmons are typically ripe in October. It’s important to note that the exact timing of the harvest may vary depending on the weather and location.

To ensure that you are getting the best quality fruit, it’s best to wait until the fruit is fully ripe before picking.

Once you have harvested your wild fruit, it’s important to properly preserve and store it. Berries can be frozen or canned for later use, while plums and persimmons can be dried or made into jams and jellies.

These fruits can also be used to make delicious pies, tarts, and other baked goods.

Here are some recipe ideas that you can use to incorporate wild fruit into your cooking:

  • Wild Blackberry Jam: This recipe is perfect for using up a surplus of blackberries, and it makes a delicious spread for toast or a topping for ice cream.
  • Wild Plum Tart: This recipe is a great way to use up wild plums, and it makes a delicious dessert that is sure to impress.
  • Persimmon Pudding: This recipe is a classic way to use up persimmons, and it makes a delicious and comforting dessert.

Conclusion

In conclusion, wild fruit trees in Missouri offer a bountiful and delicious source of food that can be enjoyed by both humans and wildlife. From the sweet and juicy berries of the blackberry bush to the tangy and fragrant plums of the wild plum tree, there is a wide variety of wild fruits to discover and enjoy in Missouri.

Not only do these wild fruit trees provide a tasty treat, but they also play an important role in maintaining the state’s natural ecosystem.

Other Articles

Plant Grower Report